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Jul 05 2012

Shooting Boards: Our Features and Specifications

A well-made shooting board, built from quality materials is a tool that is capable of providing top quality results in the hands of any woodworker. Additionally, it can help develop a woodworker’s skill as well as improve outcomes for many woodworking tasks.

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In it’s most basic form, a shooting board is a jig that fixtures a work piece and guides a plane so that the ends and edges of a board can be trimmed, but it doesn’t have to stop there. It’s one of the most important woodworking tools. The definition of trimming itself becomes a list of desirable outcomes from a shooting board, and with a sharp iron in a plane, it can allow woodworking tolerances to 0.001-inch accuracy.

Jigs are a huge part of woodworking, and many are single purpose built. Given the small shops that many woodworkers work in, it is valuable to have some tools and jigs that will help perform a wide range of tasks, and take a minimal amount of space for storage. Continue Reading »

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May 31 2012

Help For Accurate Hand Saw Cuts

Accurate cuts right off the saw are always nice, but that isn’t always reality. Sometimes we don’t need accuracy, other times getting it will make a woodworker break out in a cold sweat. Never the less, when you really need that magic to happen, you need it. Sometimes the boards are special, rare boards, with amazing figure. Other times they are just barely large enough for the project, and every saw cut has to be right on the numbers or the last board could be too short. It’s times like that when every cut counts.

Imagine for a moment what some of those crucial cuts are about. Sawing drawer fronts in a matched flitch? Figured boards book-matched where waste isn’t an option? Need to saw dados on target? Accurate angles in face or edge grain? Thick bench legs that match? (That’s a big cut!) Tenons, Finger Joints, Dovetails?

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For a long time, I have wanted to develop a sawing fixture that offered great ergonomics, and high miter box like accuracy. I also wanted it to be widely capable of handling many sawing situations and allow the use of any saw, so that the right saw for the job could be utilized. First we developed the East / West Bench Hook, which allows the sawyer to do their best work, and then we developed a magnetic saw guide that helps maintain high sawing accuracy over a wide range of sawing situations, and as an added bonus, it also helps develop good sawing posture and muscle memory. Continue Reading »

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May 12 2012

Improving the Bench Hook for Sawing.

We’ve all used them; the venerable old Bench Hook for sawing. They do the job, sure, but they also have limitations for many situations. Plastic miter boxes too can have their limitations. Height is one and guide wear is another. The pivoting miter box with saw is a cool looking gizmo, and some work well.

The down side of good miter boxes that come with a pivoting saw is that the best ones came down the pike a century ago, and even then they were not all created equal. Many create as many conundrums as they were meant to resolve, the good ones take a lot of effort to find, and there is one saw for cutting everything with them. One saw for all crosscuts does not work well for all situations.

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I’ve wanted to develop a Bench Hook that would be a good companion to our shooting boards for some time now, and quite a few of our customers have expressed a want for one as well. My criteria for such a tool was all about the capabilities. I wanted more flexibility, and to remove some of the limitations of the common mitering fixtures and improve the ergonomics of sawing for the woodworker. This required that I take a different approach than the traditional route, and to a degree the sawyers skill is a bit more in play, but I feel the overall gains were worth it! Continue Reading »

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May 05 2012

Introducing The Ultra Shooter Shooting Board.

Published by under New Products,Shooting boards

Shooting boards are key to woodworking fit and finish. We lay out carefully, work close to the line with our saws which leaves a rough finish, and clean off our saw marks with planes that bring us right to the layout line, with a smooth finish. Precise and accurate, no matter how we measure it. If it fits and looks good, it’s right.

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Our new ‘Ultra Shooter’ is an expansion of our ’Deluxe Shooter’ model, providing seven calibratable angles from which to shoot accurately. It offers all the angles of the deluxe shooter – plus the 75-degree angle – which is very useful for trimming 15 degree wide pie shaped slices of veneer, or thicker stock for use in starburst arrangements, compass points, various inlay designs, or anything else you might imagine.

The ‘Ultra Shooter’ shares the same general design, accessories, precision and attention to detail with all our shooting boards, including the ’51 Shooter’ series. Continue Reading »

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May 01 2012

Improving Tool Sharpening Capabilities.

Sharpening. All roads in woodworking lead to it, and there seems to be as many ways to accomplish it as one can imagine. Scary Sharp with Abrasives, Water Stones, Oil Stones, Leather, Steel, Powered, which also employs abrasives, stones, leather, et al. All of the various styles have strengths as well as weaknesses. Many woodworkers often decide to mix and match different sharpening media to optimize the best methods for their kit.

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For many years, I have had a continued interested in tool sharpening, as well as how they dull through use, while paying attention to the many trade-offs offered by different sharpening methods. I looked for ways to optimize the sharpening process for better workflow. Along the way, sharpening more frequently, meaning not waiting until blades are unusably dull stood out as very important, and some other ideas became viable as solutions to challenges other woodworkers I spoke with were having. Sharpening needed to be handier, and the sharpening tools tools more effective. The fruits of these studies are coming forth in the Sharpening Aids we are offering through our ‘Woodworks Store’.

We are introducing a Sharpening Station based on Abrasives over Glass, otherwise referred to as “Scary Sharp”. We call it the ‘Sharpening Station 1’ “Scary Sharp”. There are several strengths it brings to sharpening. Continue Reading »

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Dec 16 2011

The ‘51’ Shooter Chute Board

We now offer a new board in our Shooting Board Line. It’s called the ‘51’ Shooter.

It’s our Deluxe, Basic Plus and Basic Shooters made available in “Chute Style” for the LN 51 shooting board planes.

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While we have mentioned similar news of this recently, and have been offering chute adapter kits to be used as an upgrade to our shooting board line, it just made sense to give this series it’s own identity, and make it easier to order. Continue Reading »

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Dec 01 2011

Sewing Machine Oil. An Excellent Woodshop Lubricant.

Published by under Hand Tools,Power Tools

Over the course of time I have had opportunity to observe how many oils and lubricants perform in the woodshop, and the trades. My Father and Grandfather used 3 in 1 oil in their shops, along with other brands of light machine oils available at the time.

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They also often used non-detergent 30-weight oil, but it’s terribly messy and doesn’t perform well on a lot of woodworking equipment where exposure to cold temps and sawdust are concerned. In light of what my ancestors did, I found myself thinking about, and wanting better lubricants.
Continue Reading »

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Nov 11 2011

Tip: Work to a line.

Work to a line. Cut on the waste side of the line and leave the line on the work.

Supporting Tip: Mark which side of the line will be the waste side. The waste side is the part you don’t intend to keep.

This isn’t about measuring as much as it is about marking. Marking exactly that which we want to keep is the best way to assure things fit when we assemble our project’s parts. If we don’t observe this however, it can render our careful measurements powerless. The fitment of our work is what we honor the most. Continue Reading »

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Jun 16 2011

Shooting “Chute” Boards for the LN-51

Lie Nielsen released the LN 51 chute board plane in late fall 2010, and reviews of it’s performance have been very favorable. Based on the design of the Stanley 51, this shooting board plane seeks to have all the desirable qualities of enhanced usability and durability. It’s heavy, weighing in at 9 plus pounds and the angled blade skews the cut to the board being trued. While originally made to work with Chute Boards similar to the Stanley 52 Chute Board (which offered a track, or “Chute” for the plane to ride in), it will also work on shooting boards without an enclosed chute.

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We are happy to share with you that the LN 51 is already a perfect fit on all Evenfall Studios right hand shooting board models, and if it is a Chute Board you really want, we offer a both a shooting board model called the ’51’ Shooter and a ‘Chute Adapter Kit’ that creates a true “chute board” out of many of our existing shooting board models for the LN 51. Continue Reading »

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Jun 05 2011

Where High Quality Matters.

Woodworkers often ponder what matters to produce the highest quality outcomes in woodworking. Defining quality is the key. It is a combination of tooling and technique to be sure. There are times we can save money; there are times we should invest for the long haul from the beginning. It isn’t always about money as much as it is about how far we want to take our outcomes.

Here are some considerations for bringing high quality to woodworking. Continue Reading »

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