Archive for the 'Woodworks Store' Category

Sep 13 2014

On Sharpening Better – Part 3

Using materials in the sharpening process that cut fast, while retaining a flat sharpening surface is good criteria. This is why powered sharpening gear uses a platen beneath the abrasives, otherwise we would have no reference for our work, and desired results would be difficult to achieve with repeatability. While messy aspects of sharpening can not be completely eliminated, what if we could minimize them?

The mess and clutter of the ensemble that is sharpening gear, along with the associated set up and clean up of the process, so it works well is also in the equation. There is only so much space to begin with, and the mess becomes part of the inertia that causes us to wait longer than we should to sharpen in the first place.

Or we have precious little space to begin with, so we would have to stop and set a process aside in order to make space for sharpening, then do that, clean up and stow before resuming the woodworking process.

It isn’t any wonder why we avoid sharpening until the last minute, even as that makes the task as difficult to accomplish as any can be.

I don’t think it really has to be that way. I’ve developed some different ways of thinking about the sharpening process and some tools that help fit them. They reduce sharpening effort with no cost to edge quality.

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Sep 03 2014

Now available – New Shop Vacuum Tools and Accessories.

If you were to ask me what the most important tool in my shop is, I would have to say that it would be my entire shop. Because it takes my entire shop for me to do all that I can. Every machine, every tool is important.

But if you were to ask me which tool I use most in my shop, that’s easy, it would be the shop vacuum hands-down. I use the shop vacuum for dust collection on a number of different tools as well as for general cleanup, so that my shop is ready to use no matter what direction my next task takes me. It doesn’t make anything in particular, but my shop vacuum makes my entire shop work better, and my entire shop is my most important tool.

I’d like to share with you what I’ve learned about making what may be your most important tool, your shop, work better!

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Aug 28 2014

Recent New Tool Releases for Fall 2014

The 2014-2015 woodworking season is upon us, And we wanted to share a bit about what’s new here with everyone!

We have recently released a Sharpening Station System called the Magstrop™. It offers the ability to sharpen quickly and easily, using horse butt and suede leather strops, as well as glass platens for use with sandpaper’s from very coarse to microfine grits. The Magstrop sharpening system is expandable, and we have future plans for that but for now I’ll just say there is more coming soon.

We developed the Magstrop with several desires in mind…

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Jul 23 2014

Shooting Boards for Wide Board Work

We are now offering a shooting board that balances the need to shoot wide boards for casework and such, with good ergonomics for doing your best work.

Introducing the Wide Board Shooter™:

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The Wide Board Shooter is based on our original shooting board designs, with all the same attention to details and high accuracy that comes with them. These boards are 1.5 times (50%) longer with an overall length of 22-1/8th inches that provides shooting usability in the 18 inch width range.

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Jul 14 2014

Shooting Boards for the Number 62 Jack Plane

If I were to know I was going to be stranded on a desert island, or marooned anywhere, I would wish for a Jack Plane. If I could get any Jack Plane, I’d want the one I find most versatile, A Low Angle Jack Plane. In fact, I have said my favorite plane on a shooting board is a Low Angle Jack Plane.

The 62 was originally introduced by Stanley and has been repopularized and made better than ever by Lie-Nielsen Toolworks, redesigned and reissued by Stanley Tools, and is also part of Woodcraft’s Wood River line in recent times. We now offer a Chute-Style Shooting board for the Number 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.

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The 62 Shooter™

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Jul 13 2014

Shooting Boards for the Veritas LA Jack Plane

Hands down, My favorite plane on a shooting board is a Low Angle Jack Plane.

It isn’t that I don’t like the Shooting Board Planes, such as the Lie-Nielsen LN-51 or the Veritas Shooting Plane, because I feel they have specific strengths and forte’s on the shooting board. But the LA Jack has so much going in it’s favor, it is hard not to love it on the shooting board. Just to make the LA Jack easier to love even more on a shooting board, We now offer a Chute-Style Shooting board for the Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane.

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The Veritas LA Jack Shooter™

Some of the cool things about LA Jacks on the shooting board is that it has heft, much like the LN-51 and Veritas SP, but it is also ambidextrous, which makes it a great choice for woodworkers who favor either the right or left hand.

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Jul 05 2014

Woodworking Squarely

Recently we have had some emails from woodworkers who have been having challenges with building their projects and having them come out square.

The biggest thing we need to realize about squareness is that we take it for granted, but when we really have to make something square, it is something that begins with wood selection, and evolves from meticulous prep work.

Our layout lines have to be drawn on stock that is already “right” in terms of squareness and dimension.

The joinery we cut and form into those boards must be as accurate as the stock itself.

Fitment will tell the tale. Errors when we make any become cumulative, and sometimes the only trick that works is to be right.

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Jan 31 2014

Shooting Boards for the Veritas Shooting Sander

Veritas and Lee Valley Tools have recently released their new Veritas Shooting Sander. We offer a full line of shooting boards and accessories for use with the Veritas Shooting Sander.

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Our Veritas Sander Shooter Line of Shooting Boards.

Do you have or want a Veritas Shooting Plane or Shooting Sander? These tools will interchange on the same shooting board. Use our ‘Veritas Shooter’ shooting board for both!

For the woodworker who is not ready to invest in handplanes and the sharpening maintenance that is part of using planes to their full potential, the Veritas Shooting Sander is a great tool that will allow for utilizing the full advantages of a shooting board. If you already are an avid shooting board enthusiast, this tool opens the shooting board’s options and capabilities even further, making the toughest jobs that need truing possible and easier.
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Aug 28 2013

Shooting Boards for the Veritas Shooting Plane

Veritas and Lee Valley Tools have released their long awaited Veritas Shooting Plane. It is a very nicely engineered plane, that is very adept at it’s tasks. We have a full line of custom made shooting boards ready to order for it as well!

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May 21 2013

Dovetailed Boxes and Casework

Recently, a woodworker emailed us looking for a solution to a problem he was having with the alignment and fitment of boxes, drawers and carcass work such as blanket chests, bookcases and chests of drawers, using dovetails for the case and drawer joinery. He also mentioned his interests in small box making and again, enjoys dovetail joinery for those as well.

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The Long Grain Shooter, shown in left hand.

The alignment and fitment issue was, that once the casework was assembled, his carcass or boxes were not square from top to bottom, and the joinery would either bind, go together under extreme stress, sometimes fracturing pins or would not sit square on a flat surface when the box or casework was placed on the edges, even though the dimensional widths of the boards were perfectly the same. All this was due to mis-alignment from un-square ends on the dovetailed boards. Continue Reading »

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